Green Buildings

 

 

Stanford designs, constructs, and operates high-performance campus buildings. Accolades for design and operation abound, including LEED Platinum certifications for both New Construction and Existing Building projects on campus. Please click the building names below to learn more about these exciting and innovative projects.

Yang & Yamazaki Environment & Energy Building (2008)

The Jerry Yang & Akiko Yamazaki Environment + Energy Building (Y2E2), the first large-scale, mixed-use, high-performance building at Stanford houses cross-disciplinary teams and programs with teaching and research focused on sustainability. Y2E2 continues to serve as a learning tool for both building occupants and the campus community and recently earned a LEED-EBOM (Existing Building: Operations & Maintenance) Platinum certification, the highest rating awarded by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC). As the first LEED-EBOM certification on campus, the Y2E2 project allowed Stanford to evaluate the benefits of the certification process and further investigate opportunities in design and operation of high-performance buildings.

The project earned 82 points, exceeding the 80 point threshold required for the Platinum rating. Highlights included earning all 15 points available in the alternative transportation credit, plus a bonus point due to its regional significance, earning 14 points in the energy efficiency credit demonstrating documented energy consumption 37% better than the national median of comparable buildings, and earning all 5 available points for the performance of indoor plumbing fixtures.

Significant sustainability features of the 166,000 square-foot building include:

  • A high-performance envelope (roof, walls, windows, sunshades and light shelves) to reduce heating and cooling loads.
  • Natural ventilation via internal atria, windows, and vents with efficient active beams for mechanical cooling when needed.
  • Three solar photovoltaic demonstration installations to offset energy use.
  • Water conservation systems, including waterless urinals and dual-flush toilets. Recycled water from Stanford’s Central Energy Facility is used in toilets, urinals, and for some lab processes.
  • Extensive use of recycled materials and sustainable products, such as bamboo. Exposed concrete floors significantly reduced carpet use and saved tons of raw materials.

To learn more about Y2E2, please download the Environment + Energy fact sheet and please visit the interactive Y2E2 building dashboard.

To learn more about tours and the Y2E2 docent program, please visit the tours page.

Knight Management Center (2011)

William H. Neukom Building (2011)

Huang Engineering Center (2010)

Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (2010)

Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building (2010)

Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge (2010)

Carnegie Institution's Global Ecology Research Center (2005)

Leslie Shao-Ming Sun Field Station at Jasper Ridge (2005)

“If we are to leave our children a better world, we must take steps now to create a sustainable environment. So it is critical that we model sustainable citizenship on our own campus.”
—John Etchemendy
Provost, Stanford University
The Energy Retrofit Program has delivered an estimated cumulative savings of over 240 million kilowatt-hours of electricity since it began in 1993 – and prevented 72,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions.
New buildings must use 30 percent less energy and 25 percent less potable water than similar traditional buildings.
Systems retrofits to the most energy-intensive buildings on campus are expected to save $4.2 million a year and cut energy use by 28 percent.
About 40 percent of Stanford Dining produce is organic or regionally grown; some is even grown on campus.
About 60 percent of Stanford’s total contiguous land remains undeveloped.
Recycled paper is less expensive than virgin paper under the campus-wide office supply contract.
From 2002 to 2010, the percentage of Stanford employees driving alone to campus dropped from 72 to 48 percent.
Stanford diverted 64 percent of its solid waste from landfills in 2008—more than 14,500 tons.
Effective August 1, 2014:
Irrigation in Faculty & Staff Housing may occur only on Tuesday and Saturday nights for even numbered addresses, and Wednesday and Sunday nights for odd numbered addresses, between the hours of 7 pm and 7 am.
The goal of Sustainable IT is to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions generated by our IT infrastructure.
The goal of Sustainable IT is to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions generated by our IT infrastructure.
Stanford invests IN sustainability through a broad range of initiatives in research, education, efficiency improvement, conservation systems, new technology, student-led projects and more.
New buildings must use 30 percent less energy and 25 percent less potable water than similar traditional buildings.
New buildings must use 30 percent less energy and 25 percent less potable water than similar traditional buildings.
Systems retrofits to the most energy-intensive buildings on campus are expected to save $4.2 million a year and cut energy use by 28 percent.
About 40 percent of Stanford Dining produce is organic or regionally grown; some is even grown on campus.
From 2002 to 2008, the percentage of Stanford employees driving alone to campus dropped from 72 to 51 percent.
Stanford diverted 64 percent of its solid waste from landfills in 2008—more than 14,500 tons.
Stanford diverted 64 percent of its solid waste from landfills in 2008 – more than 14,500 tons.
The Energy Retrofit Program has delivered an estimated cumulative savings of over 240 million kilowatt-hours of electricity since it began in 1993—and prevented 72,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions.
Stanford completed 50 major water efficiency retrofit projects from 2001 through 2008, pushing down average domestic use from 2.7 million of gallons per day (mgd) in 2000–01 to less than 2.3 mgd in 2007–08, despite campus growth.
New buildings must use 30 percent less energy and 25 percent less potable water than similar traditional buildings.

RECOGNITION & AWARDS

First Place, ASHRAE Technology Award, for the Environment and Energy Building (Y2E2) in the new institutional building category (2011)

Design Award of Excellence, for Stanford Law School, William H. Neukom Building, Society of American Registered Architects (2011)

Green Project of the Year, for the Graduate School of Business’ Knight Management Center, Silicon Valley Business Journal (2010)

Best Green Building in the Bay Area, for Y2E2, San Francisco Business Times (2008)

Top Ten Green Projects, for the Carnegie Institution’s Global Ecology Research Center, American Institute of Architects Committee on the Environment (2007)

Leadership in Applying Green Building Design, for Stanford Dining, PG&E (2006)

Top Ten Green Projects, for Jasper Ridge Field Station, American Institute of Architects Committee on the Environment (2005)

Energy & Sustainability Award, for Jasper Ridge Field Station, American Institute of Architects, San Francisco Chapter (2005)